Spring Book – Chapter 11 – Spring Web

Spring Faces Component Library

The Spring Faces module comes with a set of components, which are provided through a tag library. Table 11-1 shows available tags in the Spring Faces component library. The description for each tag is taken from tag library descriptor file in the Spring Web Flow distribution from the following location; spring-faces/src/main/resources/META-INF/spring-faces.tld.

Table 11-1. Spring Faces Component library tag details

Tag Name Description
includeStyles Renders the necessary CSS stylesheet includes for the Spring Faces components. Use of this tag in the head section of a page that contains the Spring Faces components is recommended as a browser performance optimization in keeping with the Yahoo performance guidelines (http://developer.yahoo.com/performance). If this tag is not included, the stylesheet includes will be rendered inline with the first instance of a Spring Faces component that requires them.
includeScripts Renders the necessary JavaScript file includes for the Spring Faces components. Use of this tag in the head section of a page that contains the Spring Faces components is recommended as a browser performance optimization in keeping with the Yahoo performance guidelines (http://developer.yahoo.com/performance).  If this tag is not included, the script includes will be rendered inline with the first instance of a Spring Faces component that requires theme.
resource Renders a resource include that will route through the ResourceServlet. The included resource can be either CSS or JavaScript.  The type of include to render will be determined from the resource’s file extension.  The ResourceServlet will set the proper response headers for aggressive caching of the resource by the browser and will gzip the resource if the client browser supports it.  These optimizations are in line with the Yahoo performance guidelines (http://developer.yahoo.com/performance/)
resourceGroup The child “resource” components must all be of the same resource type.  This is especially useful when combining modularized CSS files for a site.  Reducing the number of HTTP requests when a page loads is one of the Yahoo performance guidelines (http://developer.yahoo.com/performance/).
clientTextValidator Applies client-side text validation behavior to a child “inputText” component.
clientNumberValidator Applies client-side numeric validation behavior to a child “inputText” component.
clientCurrencyValidator Applies client-side currency validation behavior to a child “inputText” component.
clientDateValidator Applies client-side date validation behavior to a child “inputText” component.  Field will display a popup calendar when entered.
validateAllOnClick Fires all client-side validators when a child component’s “onclick” event is fired and suppresses propagation of the event if validation fails.
commandButton Renders a gracefully degrading Ajax submit button. This button will submit the parent form using an Ajax request by default.  The component is progressively enhanced so that the submit will still function with a full page refresh if JavaScript is unavailable on the            client. The processing of the JSF component tree can be customized through use of the “processIds” attribute.  By default only the button itself will be processed during the postback lifecycle. The content to render is determined on the server side by using a render action in the flow definition that processes the request.  When updating the existing page, the rendered content must be a replacement for an existing identifiable DOM node in the page. The component is capable of driving transitions to another view with an Ajax request.  In that case, a client-side redirect to the new view will occur so that browser history and normal back button behavior is still preserved.
commandLink Renders a gracefully degrading Ajax link. This link will submit the parent form using an Ajax request by default.  The component is progressively enhanced so that the submit will still function with a full page refresh if JavaScript is unavailable on the client.  To achieve this, an HTML button will be rendered initially, and replaced with a JavaScript enhanced link.  The button is rendered with a special “progressiveLink” CSS class so that its look can be customized as desired. The processing of the JSF component tree can be customized through use of the “processIds” attribute.  By default only the button itself will be processed during the postback lifecycle. The content to render is determined on the server side by using a render action in the flow definition that processes the request.  When updating the existing page, the rendered content must be a replacement for an existing identifiable DOM node in the page. The component is capable of driving transitions to another view with an Ajax request.  In that case, a client-side redirect to the new view will occur so that browser history and normal back button behavior is still preserved.
ajaxEvent Creates a JavaScript event listener for one of the child component’s events that will trigger an Ajax submit of the parent form. The installed JavaScript listener will submit the parent form using an Ajax request.  This component is purely JavaScript based and should only be used in an environment where the availability of JavaScript on            the client is not a concern. The processing of the JSF component tree can be customized through use of the “processIds” attribute.  By default only the button itself will be processed during the postback lifecycle. The content to render is determined on the server side by using a “render” action in the flow definition that processes the request.  When updating the existing page, the rendered content must be a replacement for an existing identifiable DOM node in the page. The component is capable of driving transitions to another view with an Ajax request.  In that case, a client-side redirect to the new view will occur so that browser history and normal back button behavior    is still preserved.

Integration with Other JSF Component Libraries

Theoretically, it is possible to use any third-party JSF component library with Spring Faces. There are many JSF component libraries available in the market; some being open-source and others being commercial. Important thing to remember is that, while doing the integration, configuration in web.xml will change slightly since Spring Web Flow requests are not routed through the standard FacesServlet, rather it will be mapped to the Spring DispatcherServlet instead. As a sampling we have taken JBoss RichFaces to show the integration of Spring Faces with other third-party library.

For integrating JBoss RichFaces (JSF 1.2) to Spring Faces, perform the following steps:

  1. Filter configuration – You need to configure the filter details in web.xml as shown below.

[xml]<filter>

<display-name>RichFaces Filter</display-name>

<filter-name>richfaces</filter-name>

<filter-class>org.ajax4jsf.Filter</filter-class>

</filter>

<filter-mapping>

<filter-name>richfaces</filter-name>

<servlet-name>Spring Web MVC Dispatcher Servlet</servlet-name>

<dispatcher>REQUEST</dispatcher>

<dispatcher>FORWARD</dispatcher>

<dispatcher>INCLUDE</dispatcher>

</filter-mapping>[/xml]

  1. Configure RichFacesAjaxHandler to your FlowController bean – this is for achieving a view having combined use Spring Faces and RichFaces Ajax components.

[xml]<bean id="flowController"

class="org.springframework.webflow.mvc.servlet.FlowController">

<property name="flowExecutor" ref="flowExecutor" />

<property name="ajaxHandler">

<bean

class="org.springframework.faces.richfaces.RichFacesAjaxHandler"/>

</property>

</bean>[/xml]

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Tomcy John

Tomcy John

Blogger & Author at javacodebook
He is an Enterprise Java Specialist holding a degree in Engineering (B-Tech) with over 10 years of experience in several industries. He's currently working as Principal Architect at Emirates Group IT since 2005. Prior to this he has worked with Oracle Corporation and Ernst & Young. His main specialization is on various web technologies and acts as chief mentor and Architect to facilitate incorporating Spring as Corporate Standard in the organization.
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